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GURU NANAK

                  
GuruNanak


life period : 1469 - 1539 | place of birth : Nankana Sahib, PAKISTAN

parents : Mehta Kalu, Mata Tripta

siblings : Bibi Nanaki | children : Sri Chand and Lakhmi Chand

  occupation : Spiritual preaching.. Founder of Sikhism

spouse : Mata Sulakkhani

website : www.sgpc.net 

Through shallow intellect, the mind becomes shallow,

and one eats the fly, along with the sweets. ” 

    

I am not the born;

how can there be either birth or death for me?

I am neither a child, a young man,
nor an ancient; nor am I of any caste.” 

 

“ Do not say that the Vedas, the Bible and the Koran are false.
Those who do not contemplate them are false.
You say that the One Lord is in all, so why do you kill Chickens?
O Mullah, tell me: is this God’s Justice?
 ” 

 

BOOKS BY THE MASTER
" Japji Sahib: The Song of the Soul " ... " The Japuji: Sikh Morning Prayer " ..." The Seeker's Path: Being an Interpretation of Guru Nanak's Japji " ..." Japuji, the Immortal Prayer-chant: With a New English Rendering, Notes, and Commentary, Along with the Original Text in Roman Transliteration " ... " Japjee: Sikh Morning Prayer " 

Guru Nanak is the founder of the religion of Sikhism and is the first of the ten Sikh Gurus, the eleventh guru being the living Guru, Guru Granth Sahib. Guru Nanak travelled to places far and wide teaching people the message of one God who dwells in every one of God's creations and constitutes the eternal Truth. He setup a unique spiritual, social, and political platform based on equality, fraternity love, goodness, and virtue. It is part of Sikh religious belief that the spirit of Guru Nanak's sanctity, divinity and religious authority descended upon each of the nine subsequent Gurus when the Guruship was devolved on to them.

Commentaries on his life give details of his blossoming awareness from a young age. At the age of five, Nanak is said to have voiced interest in divine subjects. At age seven, as a child Nanak astonished his teacher by describing the implicit symbolism of the first letter of the alphabet, which is an almost straight stroke in Persian or Arabic, resembling the mathematical version of one, as denoting the unity or oneness of God. 

Rai Bular, the local landlord and Nanak's sister Bibi Nanaki were the first people who recognised divine qualities in the boy. They encouraged and supported him to study and travel. Sikh tradition states that at around 1499, at the age of 30, he had a vision. After he failed to return from his ablutions, his clothes were found on the bank of a local stream called the Kali Bein. The townspeople assumed he had drowned in the river; Daulat Khan had the river dragged, but no body was found. Three days after disappearing, Nanak reappeared, staying silent. The next day, he spoke to pronounce: "There is neither Hindu nor Mussulman (Muslim) so whose path shall I follow? I shall follow God's path. God is neither Hindu nor Mussulman and the path which I follow is God's."

Nanak said that he had been taken to God's court. There, he was offered a cup filled with amrita (nectar) and given the command, "This is the cup of the adoration of God's name. Drink it. I am with you. I bless you and raise you up. Whoever remembers you will enjoy my favour. Go, rejoice of my name and teach others to do so. I have bestowed the gift of my name upon you. Let this be your calling." From this point onwards, Nanak is described in accounts as a Guru and Sikhism was born.

Guru Nanak’s teachings can be found in the Sikh scripture Guru Granth Sahib, as a vast collection of revelatory verses recorded in Gurmukhi. He spent twenty five years of his life preaching from place to place. Many of his hymns were composed during this period. They represent answers to the major religious and social problems of the day and cogent responses to the situations and incidents that he came across. During these tours he studied other religious systems like Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism and Islam. At the same time, he preached the doctrines of his new religion and mission at the places and centres he visited. Since his mystic system almost completely reversed the trends, principles and practices of the then prevailing religions, he criticised and rejected virtually all the old beliefs, rituals and harmful practices existing in the country. This explains the necessity of his long and arduous tours and the variety and profusion of his hymns on all the religious, social, political and theological issues, practices and institutions of his period.

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