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SRI AUROBINDO

                  
AUROBINDO


life period : 1872 - 1950 | place of birth : Calcutta, INDIA

nationality : Indian | occupation : Writer, Speaker

   

  “ The Gita is the greatest gospel of spiritual works

ever yet given to the race. 

    

 “ Life is life - whether in a cat, or dog or man.

There is no difference there between a cat or a man.

The idea of difference is a human conception

for man's own advantage. ”  

  

" Metaphysical thinking will always no doubt be a

strong element in her mentality,

and it is to be hoped that

she will never lose her great,

her sovereign powers in that direction. "

  

BOOKS BY THE MASTER      

" The Life Divine 1 & 2 " ... " Essays in Philosophy and Yoga " ... " The Hidden Forces Of life " ... " Powers Within " ...   " Synthesis of Yoga 1 & 2 " ... " Integral Yoga: Sri Aurobindo's Teaching & Method of Practice " ... " The Future Evolution of Man: The Divine Life Upon Earth " ...  . " A Greater Psychology " ... " The Mother " ... " Essays on the Gita " ... " Our Many Selves: Practical Yogic Psychology " ... " The Bhagavad Gita with Text, Translation and Commentary in the Words of Sri Aurobindo " ... " The Yoga of Sleep and Dreams " ... " The Upanishads " ... " Hymns to the Mystic Fire " ... " The Human Cycle, Ideal of Human Unity, War and Self Determination " ... " Bases of Yoga " ... " Rebirth & Karma " ... " Integral Healing " ... " Looking from Within " ... " Lights on Yoga " ... " Vedic Symbolism " ... " Record of Yoga'1 & 2 " ...  " Thoughts and Aphorisms " ... " Bande Mataram: Early Political Writings " ... " Problem of Rebirth " ...  " Autobiographical Notes and Other Writing of Historical Interest " ...  " Sri Aurobindo on Himself " ... " Letters on Yoga, Vol. 1 2 3 4 " ... " Isha Upanishad " ... " Ideal Of Human Unity " ... " Sri Aurobindo on the Tantra " ...  " Collected Poems " ... " Supramental Manifestation Upon Earth " ... " Foundation of Indian Culture " ... " Love and Death " ... " The Renaissance in India and Other Essays on Indian culture " ... " Practical Guide to Integral Yoga " ... " Elements of Yoga " ... " The Mind of Light " ... " The Chariot of Jagannath " ...   " Poems From Bengali " ...  ""Collected Plays and Short Stories (2 Volumes) " ...  " Letters on Poetry, Literatu"d Art " ... " Kalidasa: Essays and Translations " ...  " Sriaurobindopanishad " ... " The Mahabharata: Essays and Translations " ... " Evolution " ...  " The Superman " ... " Thoughts and Glimpses " ...  " More Lights on Yoga " ... " Uttarpara Speech " ...  " The Yoga and Its Objects " ... " Bankim Chandra Chatterji " ... " Bankim – Tilak – Dayananda " ... " The Brain of India " ... " Hymn to Durga " ... " An International Volume of Sri Aurobindo's "Hymn to Durga " ...  " Ideal and Progress " ... " The National Value of Art " ... " Speeches " ... " Tales of Prison "" ... " The Century of Life " ... " Baji Prabhou " ... " Lyrical Poems (1930–1950) " ... " Sonnets " ...  " Letters on Savitri " ... " Essays Divine and Human Writings from Manuscripts 1910-1950 " ... " Vedic Studies " ... " Kena and Other Upanishads " ... " Savitri Part 2 & 3 " ... " The Gita in the Vision and the Words of Sri Aurobindo " ... " The Message of the Gita " ...  " The Mother and the Integral Yoga " ...  " Sri Aurobindo on Indian Art " ...  " Sri Aurobindo and the Freedom Struggle of India " ...  " Sri Aurobindo and the Freedom of India " ... " On Nationalism " ... " Lights on Life-Problems " ... " Light, Endless Light " ...  " A Journey from Politics to Yoga " ...  " Ideas and Ideals " ... " Gems from Sri Aurobindo " ...  " Avatarhood: Human and Divine " ... " The Gita for the Youth " ... " The Essential Gita " ...   " The Harmony of Virtue: Early Cultural Writings " ... " Invitation and Other Poems " ... " On Women " ... " The Philosophy of the Upanishads " ... " The Essential Aurobindo - Writings of Sri Aurobindo " . " Savitri Part 2 & 3 " ... " Savitri; a legend and a symbol " ... " The hour of God " ... " Bhagavad Gita and Its Message  " ... " Secret of the Veda " ... " The Supreme Knowledge: A Divine Plan's Companion " ... " The Future Poetry " ... " Our Many Selves: Practical Yogic Psychology " ... " Evening talks with Sri Aurobindo " ... " Growing Within: The Psychology of Inner Development " ... " The Psychic Being: Selections from the Works of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother  " ... " On Physical Education " ... " Meditation " ... " The Riddle Of This World " ... " The Ideal of the Karmayogin "

Sri Aurobindo was born in Calcutta, on 15th August 1872. His father, a thoroughly Anglicised Indian doctor in British Government service, wanted his sons to have a solid, British education, and when Aurobindo was seven, he sent him, together with his two brothers, to England with the specific instruction that the three brothers should be kept free from Indian influence.

The young Aurobindo was a brilliant student who was consistently amongst the top of his class in English, and for much of this time, he and his two brothers were supported by his scholarships. He attended what was at the time one of the best public schools in London (St. Paul’s) and later studied in Cambridge where he obtained the highest score ever awarded in Greek. When he returned to India in 1893, he had an excellent command of English, Greek, Latin and French, and knew enough German and Italian to enjoy Goethe and Dante in the original, but … he knew rather little about India. While still in England, he obtained a job with one of the Indian princes, the Gaekwor of Baroda, and after his return, he worked in Baroda for twelve years, as teacher, as private secretary to the Gaekwor, and finally as Vice-principal of the Baroda College. During this period he immersed himself deeply in Indian culture and learned Sanskrit as well as several modern Indian languages. Though he became fairly fluent in what should have been his mother tongue, Bengali, he remained more at home in English, and it is in this language that he wrote all his major works.

As he became more familiar with the Indian tradition, his admiration for the Indian tradition grew, and it became increasingly clear to him that the Indian civilization could not regain its full stature as long as India was under foreign occupation. Interestingly, at that time, this was not at all a common view: the Indian elite of those days had widely accepted the superiority of the English culture, and Aurobindo would become the first Indian intellectual who dared proclaim publicly that complete independence from Britain should be the primary aim of Indian political life. As his increasing political involvement embarrassed his employer, whose position was entirely dependent on British approval, he left Baroda service in 1906 and moved to Calcutta where he soon became one of the most outspoken leaders of the political movement for Indian independence. His writings brought him in frequent conflict with the British authorities but he carefully chose his language and repeatedly managed to escape conviction. 

During a visit to Baroda in 1907, Aurobindo took some private lessons from a Maharashtrian yogi, Bhaskar Lele. Aurobindo had no interest in personal liberation, but he knew from experience that pranayama could increase one’s mental energy and clarity, and he hoped that yoga could develop other psychological powers, which he intended to use for his political work. Within three days he managed under Lele’s guidance to completely, and permanently, silence his mind. Soon after, he had the realisation of the silent, impersonal Brahman in which the whole world assumed the appearance of “empty forms, materialised shadows without true substance”

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